If You Are a Postmenopausal Woman With Metastatic Breast Cancer of Estrogen-Receptor Positive (ER+) or Unknown Tumor,* Fareston Provides Another Option

Talk to your doctor about Fareston today

Fareston Is a Selective Estrogen-Receptor Modulator (SERM) That:

  • Is clinically proven. In a number of important measurements of a drug's effectiveness in treating metastatic ER+ breast cancer in postmenopausal women, Fareston worked just as well as tamoxifen1-4
  • May provide the continued benefits of endocrine therapy. Fareston may offer you the continued benefits of endocrine therapy if you cannot tolerate or are otherwise unable to take other endocrine therapies1-6
  • Fareston may be an effective alternative for patients who have stopped taking other endocrine therapies because of joint pain1-4,6
  • Is available and accessible. Fareston is widely available on commercial and Medicare Part D formularies and is covered by most commercial and Medicare insurance plans.7 In addition, comprehensive support for patients who have been prescribed Fareston can be found through Patient Rx Solutions, including copay savings of up to $150 a month (after paying the first $20) on your out-of-pocket prescription costs**

*"Unknown tumors" are tumors for which the hormonal status (eg, ER+ or ER-) is not known.

**The copay assistance offer is not valid for prescriptions under Medicaid, a Medicare drug benefit plan, Veterans Administration, DOD, Tricare, or other federal or state programs (such as medical assistance programs). If you are eligible for drug benefits under any such program, you cannot receive this offer. Offer expires on 1/31/2015.
Program managed by PSKW, LLC on behalf of ProStrakan, Inc. The parties reserve the right to amend or end this program at any time. Product dispense pursuant to program rules and federal and state laws.
 

References: 1. Fareston [package insert]. Bridgewater, NJ: ProStrakan, Inc; 2012. 2. Gershanovich M, Garin A, Baltina D, et al. A phase III comparison of two toremifene doses to tamoxifen in postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer. Eastern European Study Group. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1997;45(3):251-262. 3. Hayes DF, Van Zyl JA, Hacking A, et al. Randomized comparison of tamoxifen and two separate doses of toremifene in postmenopausal patients with metastatic breast cancer. J Clin Oncol. 1995;13(10):2556-2566. 4. Pyrhönen S, Valavaara R, Modig I, et al. Comparison of toremifene and tamoxifen in post-menopausal patients with advanced breast cancer: a randomized double-blind, the 'nordic' phase III study. Br J Cancer. 1997;76(2):270-277. 5. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) Breast Cancer (Version 1.2013). http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/breast.pdf. Accessed February 5, 2013. 6. Hong S, Didwania A, Olopade O, et al. The expanding use of third-generation aromatase inhibitors: what the general internist needs to know. J Gen Intern Med. 2009;24(suppl 2):S383-S388. 7. Data on file. Bridgewater, NJ: ProStrakan, Inc; 2013.

Important Safety Information and Boxed Warning

 

Indication

Fareston® (toremifene citrate) 60 mg Tablets is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer in postmenopausal women with estrogen-receptor–positive or unknown tumors.

WARNING: QT PROLONGATION

Fareston has been shown to cause a change in heart rhythm (QT prolongation). This change can lead to fainting, seizures, and/or death. Do not take Fareston if you were born with or have a history of irregular heartbeats. Do not take Fareston if you have low blood potassium levels or low blood magnesium levels that are currently not corrected by treatment. There are certain medicines that should not be taken with Fareston. Talk to your doctor about all the other medicines you are taking.

Do not take Fareston if you are allergic to Fareston or any of its ingredients. You should not take Fareston if you have a history of abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), are taking other medicines that can result in abnormal heart rhythms, or were born with or have had any condition that causes abnormal heart rhythms. Do not take Fareston if you have a salt imbalance in the blood, especially low concentrations of potassium (hypokalemia) or low concentrations of magnesium in the blood (hypomagnesemia) that are currently not corrected by treatment.

Talk to your doctor before taking Fareston if you have bone metastasis or increased concentration of calcium in the blood (hypercalcemia), which may occur at the beginning of your treatment. Also talk to your doctor if you have a history of thickening of the womb lining. If you are pregnant, nursing, or may become pregnant, do not take Fareston, as it may cause fetal harm. You should not take Fareston if you have had or are at risk for getting blood clots in the legs, lungs, or eyes, as it may increase the risk of blood clots. If you have leg pain or warmth; swelling of the legs, hands or feet; chest pain; shortness of breath; or a sudden vision change, stop taking Fareston and call your doctor, as these may be signs of a blood clot. The most common side effects of Fareston are hot flashes, nausea, sweating, and vaginal discharge. To report suspected adverse reactions, contact ProStrakan, Inc, at 1-800-305-FARESTON (1-800-305-3273), or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or visit www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Expand Safety Information

Important Safety Information and Boxed Warning

Indication

Fareston® (toremifene citrate) 60 mg Tablets is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer in postmenopausal women with estrogen-receptor–positive or unknown tumors.
WARNING: QT PROLONGATION
Fareston has been shown to cause a change in heart rhythm (QT prolongation). This change can lead to fainting, seizures, and/or death. Do not take Fareston if you were born with or have a history of irregular heartbeats. Do not take Fareston if you have low blood potassium levels or low blood magnesium levels that are currently not corrected by treatment. There are certain medicines that should not be taken with Fareston. Talk to your doctor about all the other medicines you are taking.

Do not take Fareston if you are allergic to Fareston or any of its ingredients. You should not take Fareston if you have a history of abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), are taking other medicines that can result in abnormal heart rhythms, or were born with or have had any condition that causes abnormal heart rhythms. Do not take Fareston if you have a salt imbalance in the blood, especially low concentrations of potassium (hypokalemia) or low concentrations of magnesium in the blood (hypomagnesemia) that are currently not corrected by treatment.

Talk to your doctor before taking Fareston if you have bone metastasis or increased concentration of calcium in the blood (hypercalcemia), which may occur at the beginning of your treatment. Also talk to your doctor if you have a history of thickening of the womb lining. If you are pregnant, nursing, or may become pregnant, do not take Fareston, as it may cause fetal harm. You should not take Fareston if you have had or are at risk for getting blood clots in the legs, lungs, or eyes, as it may increase the risk of blood clots. If you have leg pain or warmth; swelling of the legs, hands or feet; chest pain; shortness of breath; or a sudden vision change, stop taking Fareston and call your doctor, as these may be signs of a blood clot. The most common side effects of Fareston are hot flashes, nausea, sweating, and vaginal discharge. To report suspected adverse reactions, contact ProStrakan, Inc, at 1-800-305-FARESTON (1-800-305-3273), or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or visit www.fda.gov/medwatch.